About Gorean Women in General and Why Gorean Men Believe Women Only Exist to Please Men

Why do we please men? From A to Z


 

Introduction:

The Gorean woman, for reasons that are not altogether clear to me, considering the culture, rejoices in being a woman.  She is often an exciting, magnificent, glorious creature, outspoken, talkative, vital, active, spirited.  On the whole I find her more joyful than many of her earth-inhabiting sisters who, theoretically at least, enjoy a more lofty status, although it is surely true that on my old world I have met several women with something of the Gorean zest for acknowledging the radiant truth of their sex, the gifts of joy, grace and beauty, tenderness, and fathoms of love that we poor men, I suspect, may sometimes and tragically fail to understand, to comprehend.  (Priest-Kings of Gor, chapter nine, pp 67-68)

A – C

Beauty of:  

“To be sure, you were very beautiful,” he said, “but the beauty of a free woman, you must understand, is no more than the promise, the hint, of what her beauty would be as a slave. A slave is a thousand times more beautiful than a free woman.” (Prize of Gor, Chapter 15, page 326) 

Bells, Ankle:  

The cosmetics of slaves are not that different, interestingly, from those of free women on Earth. Gorean free women do not use cosmetics, or supposedly do not use them, though ankle bells, concealed by their robes, and perfumes are permitted to them. Cosmetics, on Gor, are regarded as salacious, improper, offensive and scandalous in the case of a free woman; such things are associated with slaves. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 30, pages 1233-1234) 

Bride Price: 

She replied proudly, “My bride price would be a hundred tarns.”
I whistled softly to myself—my ex-slave would have come high. On a Warrior’s allowance I would not have been able to afford her. (Tarnsman of Gor, Chapter five, pages 52-53)

Then I thought to myself, a hundred tarns indeed! Forty perhaps, because she was a beauty. For a hundred tarns one might have the daughter of an Administrator, for a thousand perhaps even the daughter of the Ubar of Ar! A thousand tarns would make a formidable addition to the cavalry forces of a Gorean warlord. Sana, collar or no, had the infuriating, endearing vanity of the young and beautiful of her sex. (Tarnsman of Gor, Chapter five, page 53)

Capture Contract:

Targo then, piece by piece, from the leather pouch at his belt, handed forty-five pieces of gold to the chief of the two men. The girls cried out in amazement. It was a fantastic price. And he had not even assessed her! We realized then that she had been contracted for in advance. The two men took Targo’s gold and withdrew into the darkness.
“You were foolish to hire mercenaries to guard you,” said Targo. (Captive of Gor, Chapter 7, page 75)

Captured, in regard to being:

“Remove your clothing,” I said.
“No!” she cried, shrinking back. She rose to her knees before me, putting her head to my feet. “With all my heart, Warrior,” she pleaded, “the daughter of a Ubar, on her knees, begs your favor. Let it be only the blade and quickly.”  (Tarnsman of Gor, Chapter seven, pages 74-75)

The harsh, exogamous institution of capture is woven into the very fabric of Gorean life.  It is regarded as meritorious to abduct one’s women from a foreign, preferably hostile city.  Perhaps this institution, which on the surface seems so deplorable, is profitable from the standpoint of the race, preventing the gradual inbreeding of otherwise largely isolated, self-sufficient cities.  Few seem to object to the institution of capture, not even the women who might seem to be its victims.  On the contrary, incredibly enough, their vanity is terribly outraged if they are not regarded as worth the risks, usually mutilation and impalement.  One cruel courtesan in the great city of Ar, now little more than a toothless, wrinkled hag, boasted that more than four hundred men had died because of her beauty.  (Outlaw of Gor, chapter six, pages 50-51) 

It was customary on Gor for a female captive to kneel in the presence of her captor,… (Outlaw of Gor, chapter fifteen, page 133)

I knew what must now pass, and it was what would have passed in any city or on any road or trail or path in Gor.  She was a captive female, and must, naturally, submit to her assessment as prize; she must also be, incidentally, examined for weapons; a dagger or poisoned needle is often concealed in the clothing of free women. (Nomads of Gor, chapter six, page 37) 

“The Lady Vivina,” I said to him, “will of course grace the prow of this ship, the flagship of the treasure fleet.”
“No!” she screamed.
“Yes, Captain,” said Clitus.
Already two men held her arms.
“Take then those that were with her,” I said, “and distribute them to the extent of their number among our other ships, the twenty most beautiful to our twenty tarn ships now with the fleet, and the most beautiful of the twenty to the prow of the Dorna, and the other twenty set at the prows of twenty of our prizes.
“Yes, Captain,” said Clitus.  Men laid hands on the two girls behind the Lady Vivina, and they cried out with fear. (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 14, page 209)

“I — I,” she said, “will remove my veil.”
“That will not be necessary,” I said.
I handed Clitus the book of cargo lists and strode to the girl, jerking out the pins that held her veil, face stripping her.
“Beast!” she cried.
I gestured that the seamen should remove the veils from the two girls who stood behind her.
They wept.
They were beauties, all.
I looked down into the face of the Lady Vivina, who was beautiful.
“Put her at the prow,” I said to Clitus.  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 14, page 210)

In the five days it had taken to reach Port Kar from the scene of the engagement with the treasure fleet, due to the slowness of the round ships, I had not kept Vivina, and her maidens, of course, at the prows of the ships.  I had only placed them there in victory, and now again, for the entry of Port Kar. (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 15, page 215)

“I was taken slave at the age of seven in a raid,’ she said,… (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 18, page 292)

“The men will come with weapons,” I said. “Where is the collar?”
She looked at me. “Must I wear it?” she asked.
“Yes,” I said. I did not want her slain, if possible, when the men came. If they thought her a free woman, and mine, she might be swiftly killed, or tortured and impaled. (Place: Port Kar, during the siege of the Holdings of Bosk of Port Kar) (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 18, page 295)

There were some cage wagons, perhaps carrying high slaves or women of political importance. The slaves could be seen, stripped, behind the bars. Were they high slaves that must have been humiliating for them. But then high slaves are, when all is said and done, slaves, no more or less slave than the lowliest kettle-and-mat girl. On the other cage wagons, silken curtains were drawn, within the bars. To be sure, those within, perhaps robed free women, might put out their small hands, lightly, and feel the bars on the other side of the silk. They, too, were incarcerated, as much as a stripped slave. Sometimes captured free women are given only a light, single, sliplike garment to wear. This makes them uneasy. (Place: outside of Ar, March of Cosian Occupational Forces) (Prize of Gor, Chapter 20, pages 644-645) 

Do they not understand now that they are amongst the most beautiful and desirable of women, women who, by the will of men, will be kept as they should be kept, as slaves? Perhaps they are trinkets and baubles, but they are trinkets and baubles which are zealously coveted, and relentlessly sought. Do you think they do not know that when a city falls and they are led forth in their chains, herded along, perhaps cruelly prodded, with other domestic animals, that they are esteemed the most luscious of booty and loot, the most relished of prizes and treasures? (Prize of Gor, Chapter 26, pages 963-964) 

The slave is safer, by far, almost always, than a free woman, for the slave, as she is an animal, is not likely to be killed; rather she is likely merely to change hands, as might a Kaiila or tarsk. Do not free women, in the fall of a city, often tear away their clothes and cast themselves naked before the conquerors, begging to be kept as a slave? Do not others find collars and attempt to conceal themselves amongst slaves, but are then seized and bound by the slaves and presented naked to the conquerors, exposed in their deceit. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 27, page 1057) 

Amongst the boys in their little clouds or gangs, roaming about, looking for some “good ones” amongst the “ring girls,” those chained to the public rings, there will occasionally be one or two older ones, who will carry switches. This is in case they find a slave who has been a free woman taken from an enemy city, particularly recently. They may then switch her, and she will kneel, and cover her head, and cry. She cannot escape, of course, as she is chained in place. Soon, hopefully, her master will return and good-naturedly shoo the boys away. She must expect such things, I suppose, given her antecedents. They still think of her as a woman of the enemy. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 27, pages 1123-1124) 

She would remain a slave, incidentally, even if she were to be returned to her original city. Indeed, there, she would be treated with great cruelty, perhaps even slain. In becoming a slave, you see, she has dishonored its Home Stone. She would beg piteously not to be returned to that city. There she could expect nothing better than a paga tavern or brothel. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 27, page 1124) 

Caste System, Women within the: 

I had seen few women, but knew that they, when free, were promoted or demoted within the caste system according to the same standards and criteria as the men, although this varied, I was told, considerably from city to city.  (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter three, page 30)

Theoretically, given the seclusion of the High Caste women of Ar, their gilded confinement in the Walled Gardens, it should be reasonably easy to conceal her identity. (Tarnsman of Gor, Chapter 9, page 86)

Chastity or lack there of:  

“Poor warrior,” said she, her eyes smiling over the veil, “you do not even have enough to pay for the use of a skilled slave girl.”

“That is true,” I admitted.

She laughed and with an easy motion dropped the veil from her face and shook her head, freeing her hair. She held out her hands. “I am only a poor free woman,” said she, “but might I not do?”

I took her hands and drew her to me, and into my arms. (Tarl Cabot and the Lady Dina of Turia, she remained free)  (Nomads of Gor, Chapter twenty-one, page 238) 

The free male, should he have an interest in free women, perhaps he has no access to slaves, usually initiates the sexual encounter. He petitions the free woman, so to speak, who may or may not accede to his petition. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 26, page 955) 

The uses for which we petition, you see, as we are slaves, will be very different from the tamenesses which would be appropriately accorded to a free woman, uses conformable to her status and dignity. We wish to be handled quite otherwise. We wish to be handled as slaves. We wish to be positioned, turned about, knelt, spread, bound, such things. We wish to be treated as the slaves we are. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 26, page 956) 

Children, female:  

Later a small girl had drifted to the front of the shelf. She was clad in a child’s version of the Robes of Concealment. The tips of purple slippers could be seen beneath the hem of the robes. She was veiled. Her head, forehead and hair were covered, too, as is common. Ellen could see her dark brown eyes, wide, looking at her, over the white veil. Ellen and the others were in first position. A woman, similarly attired, with robes and veil, presumably her mother, hurried up to her and seized her by the hand, pulling her forcibly away. “Don’t look at those terrible, nasty, dirty things in their collars and chains!” she scolded.

(Prize of Gor, Chapter 17, page 456) 

Collared, Actions to merit being: 

“You came unattended, unprotected, to a festival camp of conquerors, of Cosians. You sat with men, chatting with them. Do you not think they would be curious as to what might lie hidden beneath your veils? Do you not think they would speculate as to what delights might lie concealed within your cumbersome robes? And do you think they would fail to note the putative value of your necklace, the sparkle of your jeweled robes and veils? And surely you knew that hundreds of women were to be marketed. And did you not flirt with the men? Was your veil not disarranged as though inadvertently when you drank? Did you not sit in a certain fashion, turned to the side, legs together, as a slave girl might sit, if she were permitted to sit? Did you not insolently, haughtily, arrogantly, put a naked slave to your feet, and not realize that men would be curious as to what you yourself might look like, put similarly to their feet? Did you not know that your carriage, and demeanor, your pride and pretensions, might try the patience of men? Did you not know that such might tempt them to transform you into something of more interest to them, that they might consider taking you in hand and turning you into a luscious, cringing slave, pathetically begging to please in whatever manner they might desire? And do not think that I did not see the hem of your robe lifted in such a way as to bare an ankle!” (Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, page 837) 

“If your bondage is important to you, and you understand it as your one possibility to obtain your total fulfillment as a female, you may always again expose yourself to the risk of the collar, disarranging a veil, walking lonely bridges at night, lifting the hem of a garment, as though to avoid soiling it in puddles in the street, speaking insolently to strangers, denouncing the Home Stones of visitors to your city, accompanying ill-guarded caravans, and such.” (Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, page 842) 

“How came she here?” called a man.

“She came alone, unguarded, of her own choosing, to the camp,” responded the auctioneer.

“Thirty-eight copper tarsks is too much for so stupid a woman!” called a man.

This observation was greeted with laughter. (free woman newly collared on the slave block being auctioned) (Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, page 856) 

“Do you beg to be purchased, my dear,” said the auctioneer, solicitously, but in a voice which could easily be heard well out into the crowd.

“Oh, yes!” she cried. “Yes! Yes! I beg to be purchased!”

There was much laughter from the crowd.

“Only slaves beg to be purchased,” the auctioneer informed her.

“No!” she cried.

“On your knees, slave girl!” snapped the auctioneer.

(Newly collared Free Woman being auctioned) (Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, pages 856-857) 

Accordingly, the former free woman, as other Gorean free women, would doubtless have heard of, or been apprised of, doubtless to her scandal and horror, and doubtless in whispers, behaviors sometimes attributed to slave girls on the block.

And so the former free woman begged to be purchased.

And it seemed, as far as Ellen could gather, that she was not, as the auctioneer had speculated, unfamiliar with the way in which this might be done.

Free women, after all, if only in virtue of hushed, furtive, scandalous rumors, would not be all that unacquainted with at least the possibility of such a thing.

(Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, page 861) 

Collared, in regards to being:  

Indeed, she saw, with mixed feelings, that he regarded her as a quick, bright slave. She feared that that might put him more on his guard against her. But surely he must understand that the intelligence of a woman did not disappear in the searing moment her flesh took the iron, or the instant that her small neck felt clasped upon it a steel band. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 11, page 194)

Needless to say these possible linguistic precautions and subtleties would not be effective with native Gorean women, should they find themselves put to the collar. On the other hand, once they have been embonded, slavery will inevitably work its subtle effects on them, as it does on all women, and, after a time, they, too, in glances, mannerisms, phrasings, tones of voice, tiny movements, and such, will

reveal themselves slave. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 16, page 383) 

In any event, aware of her status and station the Gorean free woman, particularly if of high caste, commonly regards herself, and is culturally justified in doing so, as a very special and superior creature, one generally aloof and unapproachable, one commonly lofty and exalted. She has, after all, a Home Stone. Accordingly, as might be expected, she is often vain, petty, selfish, supercilious, and arrogant. One might then have some understanding of the radical and traumatic transformation, with all its attendant mental and psychological anguish, which such a woman might undergo should she become a slave. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, pages 886-887) 

Comparisons; Free Women of Gor and Free Women of Earth:  

I think that it is seldom that stupid women are brought to Gor. The Gorean master, you see, looks for high intelligence in a female slave. It is one of his pleasures to take a highly intelligent woman, even a brilliant woman, provided, of course, that she is attractive, would be of interest in chains, is likely to squirm well in the furs and such, and teach her her womanhood, a lesson which is too often neglected in the education of a free female, either on Gor or Earth. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 24, pages 808-809) 

Gorean free women, particularly of high caste, have a status which is far higher than that of the average free woman on Earth. Indeed, the average free woman of Earth would have very little understanding, at least initially, culturally, of the social station of a Gorean free woman. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, page 886) 

To be sure, it should in all honesty be admitted that Gorean women, at least after some initial adjustments, do quite well in slavery. Given no choice they, as their Earth sisters, thrive in their collars. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, page 887) 

“Recall that I was not only a woman of Earth, but a lady, a lady of Earth!” She hoped that that expression would turn him from his intent, for the station of “lady,” on Gor, is a lofty one. He need not know that it had a lesser status on Earth. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 26, page 939) 

Concealing or Hiding Women from others:  

It is not unusual on Gor, however, to conceal women, either free or slave. Do not peasants upon occasion hide their daughters? Do not the men of the Tahari order their slaves to the tents upon the approach of

strangers, and so on? (Prize of Gor, Chapter 26, page 949) 

Cosmetics:  

The cosmetics of slaves are not that different, interestingly, from those of free women on Earth. Gorean free women do not use cosmetics, or supposedly do not use them, though ankle bells, concealed by their robes, and perfumes are permitted to them. Cosmetics, on Gor, are regarded as salacious, improper, offensive and scandalous in the case of a free woman; such things are associated with slaves. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 30, pages 1233-1234) 

“Courting the Collar”:  

There were few free women in the camp. The woman must indeed be bold, thought Ellen; perhaps she was wealthy, and well protected. If Ellen were a free woman, she did not think that she would have come to such a camp, unless she was prepared to risk her freedom. Ellen wondered if the woman was courting the collar. (Place: Outside Brundisium within a Festival Camp) (Prize of Gor, Chapter 22, page 702-703) 

Perhaps, say, a woman, doubtless a free woman, as a slave would be very unlikely to risk this, has irritated or annoyed a man. Has this been done deliberately? Doubtless. But, why? Perhaps she is merely nasty, or unhappy, and feels secure in her freedom. Perhaps, on the other hand, she is, subconsciously presumably, as the saying is, “courting the collar.” Who knows? Is her unpleasantness merely something to be reprimanded by the collar, that she is to be taught, stripped at a man’s feet, that such a thing is impolite, and unacceptable? Or is it rather an unwitting, scarcely understood, cry from her heart, a cry for the secret, yearning slave to be released from the dungeon of denial in which she has for so long languished, neglected and ignored, a plea for her to be permitted to emerge at last into the liberation of total bondage, and helpless, absolute love? (Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, pages 885-886) 

First, some free women, disconsolate and lonely, unhappy, miserable, deprived of sex, starved for love, distressed with the numerous circumscriptions and constraints which confine them, realizing the boredom, the emptiness, of their lives, “court the collar.” Consciously, of course, they will deny this sort of thing. An example might be the former Lady Melanie of Brundisium, now collared. They might, for example, wander the high bridges at night, or frequent low markets and gloomy streets. They may undertake long and dangerous journeys, stay at unsavory inns, and so on. They might be careless with their veiling, or, seemingly inadvertently, reveal a wrist or ankle. Some might even disguise themselves as slaves, convincing themselves that this is merely a sprightly lark, unattended with danger. Perhaps they even dare to enter a paga tavern, just to see what they are like, or perhaps wander in the Street of Brands, to stroll through the open markets or slave yards, to see true slaves, chained, or caged. But how easily they might suddenly sense a narrow cloth loop passing over their head and before their eyes, what is it, and then feel it jerk back tightly, cruelly, between their teeth. In strong arms they are helpless. Soon ropes are fastened on them, plenteously, perhaps to convince them that they are now other than they were, and they are carried between buildings, and down stairs, to be left in a basement, gagged, and bound hand and foot, heavily, until nightfall, when they will be placed in a wagon, perhaps with others, to be removed from the city. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 30, pages 1261-1262)

D – F

Dancing, during Festivals and Rituals: 

It was Telima who began first to pound the woven rence mat that was the surface of the island with her right heel, lifting her hands, arms bent, over her head, her eyes closed.
Then the other girls, too, began to join her, and at last even the shiest among them moved pounding, and stamping and turning about the circle.  The dances of rence girls are, as far as I know, unique on Gor.  There is some savagery in them, but, too, they have sometimes, perhaps paradoxically, stately aspects, stylized aspects, movements reminiscent of casting nets or poling, of weaving rence or hunting gants.  But, as I watched, and the young men shouted, the dancers became less stylized, and became more universal of woman, whether she be a drunken housewife in a suburb of a city of Earth or a jeweled slave in Port Kar, dances that spoke of them as women who want me, and will have them.  To my astonishment, as the dances continued, even the shiest of the rence girls, those who had to have been forced to the circle, even those who had tried to flee, began to writhe in ecstasy, their hands lifted to the three moons of Gor. (Rencers, Vosk Delta) (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 5, page 45-46) 

Dancing Girls, Free: 

There was too a free dancing girl, a beauty with high cheekbones, named Sandra, who much pleased herself with the men of Bosk, and earned much moneys in the doing of it. (Place: Port Kar) (Captive of Gor, Chapter 17, pages 358-359) 

Dangers for Free Women alone on Gor: 

“Alone,” she said, “I will be eaten by animals or found by soldiers.” She shuddered. “At best, I would be picked up by slavers and sold in the Street of Brands.”
I knew that she spoke the truth or something much like it. A defenseless woman on the plains of Gor would not have much chance. (Tarnsman of Gor, Chapter 8, page 83)

Free women on Gor do not travel attended by only a single warrior, not of their own free will. (Tarnsman of Gor, Chapter 9, page 86)

She was, I forcibly reminded myself, not a Gorean girl, but one of Earth. She was not natively Turian nor Tuchuk. She could not even read the language. To almost anyone who would come upon her she might seem but a beautiful barbarian, fit presumably by birth and blood only for the collar of a master. She would be vulnerable. She, without a defender, would be helpless. Indeed, even the Gorean woman, outside her city, without a defender, should she escape the dangers of the wild, is not likely long to elude the iron, the chain and collar. Even peasants pick up such women, using them in the fields, until they can be sold to the first passing slaver. Miss Cardwell would need a protector, a defender. (Nomads of Gor, Chapter twenty-five, page 287) 

There were few free women in the camp. The woman must indeed be bold, thought Ellen; perhaps she was wealthy, and well protected. If Ellen were a free woman, she did not think that she would have come to such a camp, unless she was prepared to risk her freedom. Ellen wondered if the woman was courting the collar. (Place: Outside Brundisium within a Festival Camp) (Prize of Gor, Chapter 22, page 702-703) 

Domestic Duties:

Thus even families who cannot afford to own and feed a slave often have the use of several such unfortunate girls, commonly captured from hostile cities. Free women often treat such girls with great cruelty, and the mere word of a free woman, that she is displeased with the girl’s work, is enough to have the girl beaten. The girls strive zealously in their work to please the free women. (Captive of Gor, Chapter 15, page 317)

The Gorean free woman, often, does only what work she chooses. If she does not wish to prepare a meal, she and her companions may go to the public tables, or, should they wish, order a girl to bring them food from the central kitchens. (Captive of Gor, Chapter 15, page 317)

Similarly the Gorean free woman does not seem appropriately suited to menial tasks. She is too free, too proud. It is difficult for a collared slave girl to even to look into the eyes of such a person. Thus, who is to do such work? The answer seems obvious, that it be done by the slaves. (Captive of Gor, Chapter 15, page 318) 

Drinking with Veils: 

The woman had lifted her veil with her left hand, just a little, to drink from the goblet. Ellen could see the impression of the upper rim of the goblet through the veil. Lower-class women sometimes drink through the veil, and their veils, subsequently, may be severally stained. Ellen saw that the woman’s body was very straight as she drank. As the veil was lifted somewhat, as she drank, one could see a bit of her throat, white and lovely, where a collar might be nicely locked.(Prize of Gor, Chapter 22, page 703) 

Education; How Free Women of High Caste were raised:  

“Are you of Gor or not?  I have never seen my father except on the days of public festivals.  High Caste daughters in Ar are raised in the Walled Gardens, like flowers, until some highborn suitor, preferably a Ubar or Administrator, will pay the bride price set by their fathers.” (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter eight, page 81) 

Employment of:  

“How do you live?” I asked.

“I shop for wealthy women,” said she, “for pastries and tarts and cakes things they will not trust their female slaves to buy.” (Nomads of Gor, Chapter twenty-one, page 238) 

Etiquette: 

“The Lady Vivina,” said he, “asks to be presented to you.”
“Very well,” said I.  “Tell her that her request to present herself to me has been granted.”  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 14, page 208)

Introductions:

“May I present, Captain,” said Chenbar, “the Lady Vivina?”
She dropped her head, and then lifted it.
“I am honored,” I said.
“Tharlarion,” she said.
The girl turned and was escorted, again by Chenbar, her gloved hand in his, to her seat on the dais.  (Place: Telnus, within Ubarate of Cos) (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 13, page 176)

Then she caught herself and presented herself before me, as a high-born lady.
“I am Vivina,” said she, “of the city of Kasra of Tyros.”  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 14, page 208)

Sitting:

Verna sat cross-legged, like a man. I knelt, as a serving slave. (Verna the Panther Girl) (Captive of Gor, Chapter 15, page 301)

“How is she?” asked Verna, who had now again resumed her place, seating herself cross-legged by Rask of Treve’s side.(Verna the Panther Girl) (Captive of Gor, Chapter 15, page 304)

At the head of the feast sat the magnificent Rask of Treve, in his victory. At his side, cross-legged, sat Verna, the panther girl, who was served by we girls as might have been a warrior. (Captive of Gor, Chapter 15, page 325) 

Face-stripping:  

“Tal, Warrior,” she said, softly, her voice emotionless.

Then, for a Gorean woman, she did an incredible thing.

Without speaking, she slowly unwound the veil from her face and dropped it to her shoulders.  She stood before me, as it is said, face-stripped, and that by her own hand.  She looked at me, openly, directly, not brazenly, but without fear.  Her hair was brown and fine, the splendid grey eyes seemed even more clear, and her face, I saw, was beautiful, even more beautiful than I had imagined.

“Do I please you?” she asked.

“Yes,” I said.  “You please me very much.”

I knew that this might be the first time a man had looked upon her face, except perhaps a member of her own family, if she had such. (Outlaw of Gor, chapter six, page 55) 

“I — I,” she said, “will remove my veil.”
“That will not be necessary,” I said.
I handed Clitus the book of cargo lists and strode to the girl, jerking out the pins that held her veil, face stripping her.
“Beast!” she cried.
I gestured that the seamen should remove the veils from the two girls who stood behind her.
They wept.
They were beauties, all.
I looked down into the face of the Lady Vivina, who was beautiful.
“Put her at the prow,” I said to Clitus.  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 14, page 210)

Lastly it might be mentioned that it is traumatic for a Gorean woman, when captured, to be unveiled. “Remove her veil” is a command she dreads to hear, one which strikes with fear and misery to the heart of her being. The vulgar expression for this is “face-stripping.” This makes some sense to me, as the face is so expressive. In removing the veil from a woman’s face, one takes her from herself; one denies her to herself; one makes her public, so to speak, like a slave. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 16, page 394) 

The Free Companion:  

There is no marriage, as we know it, on Gor, but there is the institute of the Free Companionship, which is its nearest correspondent.  Surprisingly enough, a woman who is bought from her parents, for tarns or gold, is regarded as a Free Companion, even though she may not have been consulted in the transaction.  More commendable, a free woman may herself, of her own free will, agree to be such a companion.  And it is not unusual for a master to free one of his slave girls in order that she may share the full privileges of a Free Companionship.  One may have, at a given time, an indefinite number of slaves, but only one Free Companion.  Such relationships are not entered into lightly, and they are normally sundered only by death.  Occasionally the Gorean, like his brothers in our world, perhaps even more frequently, learns the meaning of love.  (Outlaw of Gor, chapter six, page 54)

This harsh treatment, incidentally, when she is thought to deserve it, may even be inflicted on a Free Companion, in spite of the fact that she is free and usually much loved.  According to the Gorean way of looking at things a taste of the slave ring is thought to be occasionally beneficial to all women, even the exalted Free Companions.

Thus when she has been irritable or otherwise troublesome even a Free Companion may find herself at the foot of the couch looking forward to a pleasant night on the stones, stripped, with neither mat nor blanket, chained to a slave ring precisely as though she were a lowly slave girl.

It is the Gorean way of reminding her, should she need to be reminded, that she, too, is a woman, and thus to be dominated, to be subject to men.  Should she be tempted to forget this basic fact of Gorean life the slave ring set in the bottom of each Gorean couch is there to refresh her memory.  Gor is a man’s world. (Priest-Kings of Gor, chapter nine, pg 67)

…the dignities of the couch are, by custom, reserved for the Free Companion. (Priest-Kings of Gor, chapter nine, pg 68)

And consider that free man who calculates so carefully the advantages of a companionship, who so carefully measures out the prospects of a relationship, as a merchant might weigh grain upon a scale. He treats the woman as an instrument to his future, and thus treats her as more a slave than a slave. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 30, page 1260)

And what of the calculating free woman, as well, she, ensconced in veils and customs, despising men as weaklings, exploiting them, though sheltered and protected by them, viewing them as conveniences, as little more, at best, than sources of social and economic advantage, save, of course, for the gratifications she derives from their torment, from delightfully arousing in them a hundred hopes and desires which she will then enjoyably frustrate. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 30, page 1260)

Sometimes a slave learns that her master is to be companioned. In such a case she must expect to be given away or sold. This often causes her great sorrow. But certainly one could not expect the projected companion to tolerate so distractive a presence in their domicile. Free women are well aware that they cannot compete with slaves; accordingly, to the best of their ability, they see to it that any such competition is precluded. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 30, pages 1260-1261) 

Free Companionship, Arranged: 

“The Lady Vivina, as you doubtless know, is promised to Lurius, Ubar of Cos,” said Chenbar.
“I did not know,” I said, “that the promise had been given.”
“Yes,” said Chenbar, “this morning I gave my word.”  (Place: Telnus, within Ubarate of Cos) (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 13, page 177)

“This companionship,” said Chenbar, “will link our two Ubarates.  Following the ceremony of the companionship there will be a conjoining of our fleets, that we may soon thereafter pay Port Kar a visit of state.”  (Place: Telnus, within Ubarate of Cos) (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 13, pages 177-178)

Escaping From:

“Who are these women?” I asked. “Where do they come from?”
“Some were doubtless once slaves,” said Ute. “Others were once free women. Perhaps they did not care for matches arranged by their parents. Perhaps they did not care for the ways of their cities with respect to women. (Ute telling Elinor about Panther Girls) (Captive of Gor, Chapter 8, page 82)

…two more female prisoners had been brought in, girls who had been fleeing from unwanted companionships, arranged by their parents. (Captive of Gor, Chapter 15, pages 305-306)

…the capturing of two young girls, who had fled from undesired companionships, which had been arranged by their parents. (Captive of Gor, Chapter 15, page 314)

Free Companionship, rituals of: 

Then, in accord with the rude bridal customs of Gor, as she furiously but playfully struggled, as she squirmed and protested and pretended to resist, I bound her bodily across the saddle of the tarn.  Her wrists and ankles were secured, and she lay before me, arched over the saddle, helpless, a captive, but of love and her own free will. The warriors laughed, Marlenus the loudest.  “It seems I belong to you, bold Tarnsman,” she said, “What are you going to do with me?”  In answer, I hauled on the one-strap, and the great bird rose into the air, higher and higher, even into the clouds, and she cried to me, “Let it be now, Tarl,” and even before we had passed the outermost ramparts of Ar, I had untied her ankles and flung her single garment to the streets below, to show her people what had been the fate of the daughter of their Ubar.  (place – Ar) (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter nineteen, pages 172-173)

When I returned to Ko-ro-ba with Talena, a great feast was held and we celebrated our Free Companion ship.  (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter twenty, page 176)

Talena and I swore to honour that day as long as either of us lived.  I have tried to keep that promise, and I know that she has done so as well.  That night, that glorious night, was a night of flowers, torches, and Ka-la-na wine, and late, after sweet hours of love, we fell asleep in each other’s arms.  (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter twenty, page 176)

Though on Gor the free maiden is by custom expected to see her future companion only after her parents have selected him, it is common knowledge that he is often a youth she has met in the marketplace.  He who speaks for her hand, especially if she is of low caste, is seldom unknown to her, although the parents and the young people as well solemnly act as though this were the case.  The same maiden whom her father must harshly order into the presence of her suitor, the same shy girl who, her parents approvingly note, finds herself delicately  unable to raise her eyes in his presence, is probably the same girl who slapped him with a fish yesterday and hurled such a stream of invective at him that his ears still smart, and all because he accidentally happened to be looking in her direction when an unpredictable wind had, in spite of her best efforts, temporarily disarranged the folds of her veil.  (Outlaw of Gor, chapter eight, pages 67-68)

In their own quarters, unveiled Gorean women, with their family or lovers, might fix talenders in their hair.  A crown of talender was often worn by the girl at the feast celebrating her Free Companionship. (Outlaw of Gor, chapter fifteen, pages 131-132)

“When,” I asked, “High Lady, will you drink the wine of the Free Companionship with Lurius, noble Ubar of Cos?”
“I shall return first to Tyros,” she said, “where I shall be made ready.  Then, with treasure ships, we shall return in festive voyage to the harbor of Telnus, where I shall take the arm of Lurius and with him drink the cup of the Free Companionship.”  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 13, page 180)

The talender is a flower which, in the Gorean mind, is associated with beauty and passion.  Free Companions, on the Feast of their Free Companionship, commonly wear a garland of talenders.  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 15, pages 216-217)

Port Kar does not recognize the Free Companionship, but there are free women in the city, who are known simply as the women of their men.
“Are you my woman?” I asked.
“Yes,” she said.
“Then,” I said, “obey me.” (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 18, page 295)

“The companionship if gone,” said Telima. “More than a year has passed,” she pointed out, “and you have not, together, repledged it.”
“That is true,” I admitted. By Gorean law the companionship, to be binding, must, together, be annually renewed, pledged afresh with the wines of love.
“And,” said Telima, “both of you were once enslaved, and that, in itself, dissolves the companionship. Slaves cannot stand in companionship.” (Captive of Gor, Chapter 18, page 367)

The love of a free woman, should they be capable of love, is very different from the love of a slave. The free woman must have her respect, her self-esteem, her dignity. She must consider how her friends will view her, and the match, and what they will think of her, and say of her. She must consider her assets, her properties, and their protection. All details of contracts must be arranged, usually with the attention of scribes of the law. She must have a clear understanding of what will be permitted to her companion and what will not be permitted to him. Certainly, as she is free, her modesty is not to be compromised. All things are to be regulated with care, how and where he may touch her, and such. She has her position in society to consider, her station and status. She is hedged in with a thousand trammels and compromises, militating against her selfless surrender. The love of a free woman, then, to the extent that she can love, is beset with a great number and variety of considerations, with a thousand subtle and noxious calculations, plannings and governances. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 30, page 1259) 

Free Companionship, turning down a man:  

“I am from Brundisium,” said the tarnsman, pleasantly. “I asked this woman to be my free companion, but she refused. Accordingly I decided I would make her my slave.” (Prize of Gor, Chapter 13, page 285) 

Briefly there flashed through her mind the tarnsman from Brundisium who, apparently enamored of a free woman, had taken a different action, seizing the woman, to make her his slave, she then to be herself perhaps no more to him than a paga girl. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 15, page 342) 

Free Companionship, withdrawal of the man:  

Sometimes, too, a free man will withdraw from a match if he suspects that the woman’s desires and needs are unworthy of a free woman. After all, he is looking for a free woman, not a slave, a proud, lofty, noble, free woman, one who will fulfill the customs of her station, and prove to be a suitable asset, particularly with respect to connections and career. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 30, pages 1259-1260) 

Free Men, In regard of:  

Then, to my amazement, she stood up and regarded me contemptuously.  “If you had been a true warrior,” she said, “you would have taken me on the back of your tarn, above the clouds, even before we had passed the outermost ramparts of Ar, and you would have thrown my robes to the streets below to show my people what had been the fate of the daughter of their Ubar.”  Evidently she believed that I had been afraid to harm her and that she, the daughter of a Ubar, remained above the perils and obligations of the common captive.  She looked at me insolently, angry that she had so demeaned herself to kneel before a coward.  She tossed her head back and snorted. “Well, Warrior,” she said, “what would you have me do?” (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter seven, page 75)

Gorean women, whether slave or free, know that their simple presence brings joy to men, and I cannot but think that this pleases them.  (Outlaw of Gor, chapter six, page 54)

G – L

Gracefulness or lack thereof:  

Above all, though this may seems strange to some, the female slave is not permitted to move with the abruptness, the clumsiness, the awkwardness, the gross, unconscionable, offensive, mannish motions permitted to a free woman. As a female slave she is expected to be muchly aware of her very different, very lovely, very special body, so exciting and wondrous, and to carry it, and present it, beautifully. She is not a free woman. She is a female, and must move as such. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 11, page 199) 

She suddenly thought that perhaps she should try to walk like a free woman, stiffly, clumsily, affecting mannishness, moving straightly, striding, attempting to conceal her vulnerability and sex. But then she did not do so for she did not wish to be struck. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 22, pages 729-730) 

Guards:  

Free women on Gor do not travel attended by only a single warrior, not of their own free will. (Tarnsman of Gor, Chapter 9, page 86)

It is unusual to find a woman unescorted outside the walls of a city, even near the walls.  I was startled to see her alone in this wild, deserted place, far from roads and cities.  I decided to wait for her to approach.

I was puzzled.

On Gor a woman normally travels only with a suitable retinue of armed guards.  (Outlaw of Gor, chapter six, page 50)

I knew that Dorna would have little chance alone on Gor.  Resourceful as she was, even carrying riches as she must be, she was still only a woman and, on Gor, even a silver mask needs the sword of a man to protect her.  She might fall prey to beasts, perhaps even to her own tarn, or be captured by a roving tarnsman or a band of slavers. (Outlaw of Gor, chapter twenty five, page 242)

We could see a large, flat wagon, drawn by four huge, beautifully groomed black bosk.
On the wagon, under a fringed, silken canopy, on a curule chair, there sat a woman.
The wagon was flanked by perhaps forty warriors, with spears, twenty to a side. (Captive of Gor, Chapter 7, page 72) 

Hand Maidens: 

I indicated the two girls behind Vivina.  “How many of these are there?”  I asked Clitus.
“Forty,” he said.
“They did not appear,” I said to him, “on the master cargo lists.”
Clitus ginned.
The girls looked at one another uneasily.
“My maidens,” said Vivina, “will also be ransomed, though their ransoms will be less than mine.”   (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 14, page 209)

Heeling, in regards to:  

A free woman walks proudly beside a free man or, if the press does not permit this, is often accorded the privilege of preceding him. One of the most humiliating things for a Gorean free woman, after she has been enslaved, other than the loss of her name, is that she must now follow, and neither walk beside nor lead. To be sure, the tunic, the brand and collar are also instructive. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 24, page 768) 

Insults to Free Women:  

A terrible insult, on this world, to a free woman, is to tell her she is not worth a collar. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 9, page 131) 

These are expressions used, incidentally, only of slaves, not of free women. It would be a great insult to refer to a free woman as either “whitesilk” or “red-silk.” That would be terribly vulgar. Duels might be fought about such things. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 14, pages 312-313) 

Kneeling as a Free Woman:  

At last I sat cross-legged behind the low table and Lara, in the fashion of the Gorean woman, knelt beside me, resting on her heels.  (Outlaw of Gor, chapter twenty four, page 224)

The position of the Tower Slave, in which Vika knelt, differs from that of a free woman only in the position of the wrists which are held before her and, when not occupied, crossed as though for binding.  A free woman’s wrists are never so placed. (Priest-Kings of Gor, chapter six, pg 46)

Aphris of Turia, pleased with herself, assumed her place between the merchant and Kamchak, kneeling back on her heels in the position of the Gorean free woman.  Her back was very straight and her head high, in the Gorean fashion. (Nomads of Gor, chapter nine, page 94)

The girl came to be beside me, where, in the fashion of the Gorean woman, she knelt, back on her heels.  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 18, page 292)

Laundry:  

Such women, she supposed, were above menial chores. They would not, for example, do their own laundry. High-caste women, in general, or those of the Merchants, she supposed, would not do their own laundry either, but they might have a slave, or slaves, in their own domiciles to attend to such work. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 12, page 231) 

Leaving the House: 

In many cities a free woman may not even leave her dwelling, without the permission of a male guardian or member of her family.” Ute smiled up at me. “In many cities a slave girl is more free to come and go, and be happy, then a free woman.” (Captive of Gor, Chapter 8, page 82)

M – P

Men, in regard of:  

But, too, many was the time that Ellen had seen men considering even cumbersomely robed, gloved and veiled free women. Doubtless they were considering the hidden slave. To her amusement, Ellen had noted that such free women, sensing themselves within a male’s regard, while pretending to be unaware of the fact, tended to straighten their body, hold their head up, walk well, and such. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 26, page 961) 

Menstrual Cycle, pads and tampons:  

“You bled, as I understand it,” he said.

“Yes,” she said.

When this had happened she had cried out, and had been alarmed, not understanding what had occurred, it had been so long, and so unexpected. But the women who were now her teachers, three of them, different from before, only one of whom spoke English, and that a broken English, had laughed at her, thinking she must be very stupid. But they had found her water and cloths, that she might clean her leg, and a rag which she might insert into her body. They made her clean the floor of the cell. After all, it was she who had soiled it. Perhaps, surprisingly, the flow had not been negligible, at all, as one might have expected, it beginning again, but had been abundant. She wondered if, while she had been unconscious, it, or things associated with it, had begun again, only she would not then have been aware of such changes in her body. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 7, pages 94-95) 

Modesty:  

At last she took a relatively unsoiled undergarment, something blue and silk, bare at the shoulders, and drew it on, belting it with a strip of what had been her veil. It was all she wore. Surprisingly, she no longer seemed as concerned about her modesty. Perhaps she felt it would be foolish after her utter exposure. On the other hand, I think that Talena was actually pleased to be rid of the encumbering, ornate robes of the daughter of the Ubar. (Tarnsman of Gor, Chapter 8, page 81)

The slave is, you see, to be instantly available to men; her inviting, luscious intimacies, so sweet and warm between her thighs, belong not to her but to the master; she is not a free woman who may wrap and bundle herself, and shield and guard herself; she is a slave… (Prize of Gor, Chapter 18, page 556) 

A free companion would presumably not show herself naked to her lover, for such would not comport with her dignity. She is, after all, free. Too, he might then see her as a slave, think of her as a slave, and treat her as such. No free woman, surely, would wish to risk that. But perhaps some free companions did dare, in the privacy of their own compartments, to show themselves naked to their lovers. How bold they would be. How fit then would such women be for the collar! Perhaps they might even, in the privacy of their own compartments, dare a necklace or bracelet, some piece of metal on their soft flesh, this subtly suggesting, though the suggestion would doubtless be frenziedly denied, an insignia of bondage, but surely not an anklet, for that would be too slavelike. But such things could be dangerous, for the free companion who is a man is still a man, and men are excitable, and brutes.  (Prize of Gor, Chapter 19, pages 610-611) 

The baskets in which free women travel have gates, through which they may proceed with suitable modesty, with due elegance. Ellen’s basket was a cargo basket, and a deep one.  (tarn baskets) (Prize of Gor, Chapter 20, page 632)

Nose Rings (more under “Wagon People”):  

Indeed, Ellen has been informed that in the southern hemisphere such rings, (nose rings), are worn by even free women amongst certain nomadic tribes. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 26, page 979) 

Palanquins: 

…the lines of tharlarion part for a space of perhaps forty yards, through which could be seen the screened palanquins of Turian damsels, borne on the shoulders of chained slaves, among them undoubtedly men of the Wagon Peoples. (Nomads of Gor, chapter ten, page 116)

One by one the screened palanquins of the damsels of Turia were placed on the grass and a serving slave placed before each a silken mat that the inmate of the palanquin, in stepping from her seclusion, might not soil the toe or heel of her sandal or slipper. (Nomads of Gor, chapter ten, page 116)

One by one, clad in the proud arrays of resplendent silks, each in the Robes of Concealment, the damsels of Turia, veiled and straight-standing, emerged from their palanquins, scarcely concealing their distaste for the noise and clamor about them. (Nomads of Gor, chapter ten, page 117) 

Once there passed through the square a palanquin, borne by large, powerful, tunicked men. In the palanquin there indolently reposed a free woman. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 16, page 395) 

As I have mentioned, there were streets in the vicinity of the laundry pools and these streets, as was to be expected, had their share of various forms of traffic, carts, pedestrians, and such. She had even seen, once this morning, the palanquin of a free woman, being borne by male slaves. The heavy outer curtains, and even the light inner curtains, of the palanquin were drawn open and, from her knees, as she worked on the laundry, she could see a free woman reclining within the palanquin, veiled, hooded, clad in the Robes of Concealment. She lay on one elbow, and seemed bored, and indolent. Her eyes, below the hood, above the veil, idly, briefly surveyed the girls at the pools. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 18, page 575) 

Though it was late some individuals were abroad, some in palanquins, either men or women, borne by male slaves, some with guards, perhaps returning at this hour from late visits, (Place: Ar) (Prize of Gor, Chapter 19, page 611) 

Perfume: 

The cosmetics of slaves are not that different, interestingly, from those of free women on Earth. Gorean free women do not use cosmetics, or supposedly do not use them, though ankle bells, concealed by their robes, and perfumes are permitted to them. Cosmetics, on Gor, are regarded as salacious, improper, offensive and scandalous in the case of a free woman; such things are associated with slaves. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 30, pages 1233-1234) 

Poison Pins: 

In that moment both the Tatrix and Dorna the Proud plunged sharp instruments, pins of some sort, into my back and arm,

I laughed at the absurdity of this, and then, my vision blackening, the pillar whirling, I fell at their feet.  My muscles no longer obeyed my will.  (Outlaw of Gor, chapter sixteen, page144)

I knew what must now pass, and it was what would have passed in any city or on any road or trail or path in Gor.  She was a captive female, and must, naturally, submit to her assessment as prize; she must also be, incidentally, examined for weapons; a dagger or poisoned needle is often concealed in the clothing of free women. (Nomads of Gor, chapter six, page 37)

Prostitution:  

The prostitute is a thousand times above the slave.

The prostitute is a free woman, and the slave is bond.

(Prize of Gor, Chapter 12, page 256)

S – T

Sex, between the free, out of the bonds of Companionship:

After a time I saw one girl leave the circles, her head back, hair flowing down her back, breathing deeply, and scarcely was she through the circles of rencers, but a young man followed her, joining her some yards beyond the circle.  They stood facing one another in the darkness for an Ehn or two, and then I saw him, gently, she not protesting, drop his net over her, and then, by this net, she not protesting, he led her away. Together they disappeared in the darkness, going over one of the raft bridges to another island, one far from the firelight, the crowd, the noise, the dance.
Then, after some Ehn I saw another girl leave the circle of the dance, and she, too, was joined beyond the firelight by a young man and she, too, felt a net dropped over her, and she, too, was led away, his willing prize, to secrecy of his hut. (Rencers, Free Women during Festival, Vosk Delta) (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 5, page 47) 

Sex and the male slave:

“Dare you aspire to a free woman?” she demanded.
“No,” I said.  “Dare you aspire to your mistress, Slave!” she demanded.
“No,” I said, “No!”
“Why not?” she demanded.  “I am a slave,” I said. “Only a slave.”
“That is true,” she said.  “You are only a slave.”
Then, suddenly, holding my head in her hands, she pressed her lips savagely down on mine.
I tried to twist my head away, but could not.
Then she drew back her head, and, in the darkness I could sense her, and her lips, but an inch from my own.  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 4, page 36)

“I will now teach you the fate of a pretty slave,” she said.
Suddenly, her hands in my hair, she thrust her lips savagely down on mine and, to my horror, my lips met hers, but could not withstand them and I felt her head forcing mine down and I felt her teeth cut into my lips and I tasted blood, my own, in my mouth, and then, insolently, her tongue thrust into my mouth, possessively, forcing mine, as it would, from its path, and then, after some Ehn, withdrawing her tongue, she bit me, as I cried out in pain, diagonally across the mouth and lips, that, on the morrow,  when I stood at stake in festival, the marks of my mistress’s teeth, evidence of her conquest of me, would be visible in my body.
I was shattered.
I had been given the kiss of the Mistress to the male slave.
“You will move as I direct,” she said.
In the darkness, shattered, bound, mouth swollen, I heard her in horror.
Then she mounted me, and used me for her pleasure. (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 4, page 38)

Then she reclined on the mat, facing me, resting on her right elbow.  Her left knee was raised.  She looked at me.
“Serve my pleasure,” she said. (Rencers, Vosk Delta) (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 5, page 48) 

Sexuality, in regards to: 

She leaped to her feet, standing on the furs of the couch, and threw her left arm into the air. “I am Ubara!” she cried.
“Commonly,” I said, “a Ubara wears more than a golden armlet.”
“On the couch of her Ubar?” asked Telima.
“Well,” I admitted, “I do not know about that.”
“I do not either,” said Telima.  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 16, page 245)

“But sometime,” she said, teasingly, “you must love me as a slave girl.”
“Women!” I cried, in exasperation.
“Every woman,” said Telima, “sometimes wishes to be loved as a Ubara, and sometimes as a slave girl.”  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 16, page 246)

There is little doubt that the average Gorean woman is raised in a culture which is much more open, much freer and much more acceptive of sexuality. If an Earth male were to encounter a Gorean woman he would undoubtedly be extraordinarily delighted by her great interest in, and desire for, frequent and profound sexual experience. Similarly, if a Gorean male were to encounter an Earth woman, free, in her own environment, he would probably be exceedingly puzzled by her inertnesses and frigidities, her culturally conditioned inhibitions, reservations, negativities and such. Indeed, he would probably regard her as defective or insane. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 17, page 452)

But one need not be a slave to be so affected, to feel these things. To be sure, the female slave is the most sexual, loving, vulnerable, helpless and feminine of all women, but such things are not confined to those whose lovely throats are clasped securely within the circlet of bondage. Free women, too, can feel such things. For example, the mere secret touching of a slave tunic can make a free woman sob with need. Sexuality in a woman, and I wish this were clear to all men, is an entirety, a totalistic phenomenon. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 18, pages 545-546) 

Ships, being on board:  

High born ladies commonly sailed in cabins, located in the stern castle of the galleys.  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 13, page 180)

High-born ladies commonly sail in cabins, located in the stern castles of either ram-ships or round ships.  She had had, of course, a luxurious cabin in the flagship of the treasure fleet, this very ship. (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 15, page 216)

She knew that on many ships it was regarded as dangerous to carry a free woman, for such may tantalize by their very existence, exciting speculation as to the possible treasures concealed by her bulky garmenture, but not regarded as dangerous to carry a scantily clad ship slave, who, on board, serves many of the same purposes as a similarly garmented camp slave on long marches. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 27, page 1120) 

Sitting as a Slave:  

Her ankles could be seen, above her slippered feet, as the robes were lifted a bit, seemingly having been inadvertently disarranged as she sat. Her legs were turned to one side, and placed side by side, apparently demurely closed beneath her robes. Slave girls, when permitted tunics and permitted to sit, as on a log, a rock, a shelf, commonly sit thusly. This is not only congenial to a certain modesty, but men find it provocative. Ellen wondered if the woman had seen slaves sit in that fashion. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 22, page 703) 

Slavery, in regard to: 

The Gorean girl is, even if free, accustomed to slavery; she will perhaps own one or more slaves herself; she knows that she is weaker than men and what this can mean; she knows that cities fall and caravans are plundered; she knows she might even, by a sufficiently bold warrior, be captured in her own quarters and, bound and hooded, be carried on tarnback over the walls of her own city.  Moreover, even if she is never enslaved, she is familiar with the duties of slaves and what is expected of them; if she should be enslaved she will know, on the whole, what is expected of her, what is permitted her and what is not; moreover, the Gorean girl is literally educated, fortunately or not, to the notion that it is of great importance to know how to please men; accordingly, even girls who will be free companions, and never slaves, learn the preparation and serving of exotic dishes, the arts of walking, and standing and being beautiful, the care of a man’s equipment, the love dances of their city, and so on. (Nomads of Gor, chapter eight, page 63)  

Too, the Gorean free woman is subject to many constraints, physical, psychological and cultural, of which the slave is free. It is nice to think that within those cumbersome, ponderous robes a naked slave is waiting. How wonderful it is to be tunicked and safely, securely collared, to be able to move freely about, to walk and run, to be open to the sun, to feel the air and wind on one’s body, to see and feel the glory of this world, to revel in its vitalities and sensations, and, too, to know that one is excruciatingly desirable, to say nothing of knowing oneself owned, and taken in the arms of one’s master. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, page 887) 

Slaves dressing as Free Women: 

The free women, shamelessly to the mind of the rather prudish Kamchak, lowered their veils and threw back the hoods of their Robes of Concealment, enjoying the feast, eating with much the same Gorean gusto as their men.  Their beauty and the sparkle of their eyes, their laughter and conversation, to my mind immeasurably improved the evening.  Many were swift-tongued, witty wenches, utterly charming and uninhibited.  I did think, however, that it was somewhat unusual that they should appear in public unveiled, particularly with Kamchak and myself present.  (later in the story it is revealed that the women in question were actually slaves dressed as free women as sort of a joke of Saphrar the Merchant) (Nomads of Gor, chapter nine, pages 89-90)

Then, to my surprise, the girl clapped her hands sharply twice and the women about the table stood, and together, from both sides, moved swiftly to stand before us between the tables.  The drums and flutes of the musicians sounded, and to my amazement the first girl, with a sudden, graceful swirl of her body lifted away her robes and flung them high over the heads of the guests to cries of delight.  She stood facing us, beautiful, knees flexed, breathing deeply, arms lifted over her head, ready for the dance.  Each of the women I had thought free did the same, until each stood before us, a collared slave girl clad only  in the diaphanous, scarlet dancing silks of Gor.  To the barbaric music they danced. (Nomads of Gor, chapter nine, page 96) 

Slaves, dressing as:  

It is permissible, though frowned upon, for a free woman to put on the garb of a slave. Also, it is quite dangerous to do so. Many free women, so garmenting themselves, as an adventure, thinking to have the run of the city, to go into areas forbidden to free women, to see the insides of paga taverns, and such, have, to their horror, found themselves, gagged and blindfolded, struggling futilely in the tight ropes of slavers. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 11, page 201) 

Slaves, Female, in regard of:  

Indeed, it was known that some free women actually envied their lightly clad sisters in bondage, free, though wearing a collar, to come and go much as they pleased, to feel the wind on the high bridges, the arms of a master who celebrated their beauty and claimed them as his own. (Outlaw of Gor, chapter eight, page 66) 

“Well done, Tuchuk!” said the girl, saluting Kamchak.

Kamchak shrugged.

Then the girl, with vehemence, spat in the face of the lovely Aphris. “Slave girl!” hissed the girl. “Slave! Slave girl!”

She then turned and strode away, looking for warriors of the Kassars.

Kamchak laughed loudly. (Nomads of Gor, chapter 11, page 130) 

“Lift your head, Child,” said a woman’s voice.
I did so.
She was no older than I, I am sure, but she addressed me as a child.
The guard’s foot nudged me again.
“Buy me, Mistress,” I stammered.
“A barbarian,” smiled the woman. “How amusing.” (Captive of Gor, Chapter 7, pages 73-74)

She lay beside her tub, thrilled, considering the sexual freedom of the Gorean slave girl. She felt a twinge of regret for free women. How unfortunate they are, she thought. How they must envy us, she thought. It is no wonder that they hate us as they do, or as I have been told they do. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 12, page 251) 

“There may be something to that,” said Laura, “but I suspect that men dress their slaves as they do, if they dress them at all, because they find them exciting to look upon, and wish to call attention to their beauty, and enjoy displaying them as their properties. Men are so vain. You should see how some of them lead naked, painted, bejeweled slaves about on leashes, put them through slave paces publicly, make them dance in the open for tarsk-bits, put them up as stakes in the dicing halls, and marketplaces, and such. And so, perhaps, free women insist on some compensatory distinction, to make it clear that they are not to be confused with such flesh-trash. On the other hand, it is said that beneath all the clothing, the veils, the Robes of Concealment, and such, of a free woman there is still, after all, only the body of a naked slave.” (Prize of Gor, Chapter 13, page 275) 

She saw men look upon the slave girls appraisingly, admiringly. The girls, heads up, moving beautifully, seemed not to notice, but surely they knew that the eyes of masters were upon them. How could they not be? They were slaves! She wondered if, sometime, they, the natural masters, might look so upon her. To be sure, free women stiffened, and turned angrily, and looked upon the slaves disapprovingly. But what does it matter, Ellen asked herself. And suddenly it came to her again that free women hated the slaves, and envied them. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 16, page 399) 

Men, it seems, respect free women, but seek slaves, they venerate the citizeness, but it is we whom they buy; they esteem the free woman but it is we whom they rope and leash, and lead home. It is little wonder free women hate slaves, and slaves fear free women. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 18, page 557) 

The body of the sitting woman seemed stiff, and severe. Something in its mien suggested disapproval, anger, hostility and envy. Free women hate slave girls. They try to make them ashamed of their femininity, condition, beauty and passion. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 22, page 699) 

Whereas Gorean free women commonly scorn and hate female slaves, and profess no interest in them, it is clear that there are few topics of greater interest to them. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 25, page 859) 

Certainly free women often, in their envy and jealousy, do their best to discomfit a slave, to shame and

humiliate her, to treat her as a worthless, degraded object, and so on. But men prefer us. We are the women they want. We are the women they buy. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 27, page 1059) 

It is said that once one has tasted a slave, one finds it difficult to think again in terms of free women. Perhaps it is little wonder that free women so hate slaves. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 27, page 1118) 

Little love is lost betwixt free women and slaves, in either direction. Happily the men did not notice. It is one of the fears of a slave that she might be purchased by a woman. They know, in their hearts, they belong to men, and wish to belong to men, their appropriate masters in the order of nature. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 30, page 1236) 

Slaves, Male, in regard of:

Almost at my side stood the blondish girl I had first seen, she who had been primarily effectual in my capture, herself acting as the bait, the lure to which I had been drawn.  She stood proudly beside me, straight, her shoulders back, her chin high, as does a free woman beside a miserable slave, naked and kneeling. (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 3, page 16)

“I see,” said she, tauntingly, “that you find me beautiful.”  It was true.
Then she struck me suddenly, with savagery.  I cried out with pain.
“Dare you aspire to me!” she cried. “I am a free woman!” Then she hissed out, “Kiss my feet, Slave!”
In pain, on my knees, I did so, to her laughter.  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 4, page 29)

“Dare you aspire to a free woman?” she demanded.
“No,” I said.  “Dare you aspire to your mistress, Slave!” she demanded.
“No,” I said, “No!”
“Why not?” she demanded.  “I am a slave,” I said. “Only a slave.”
“That is true,” she said.  “You are only a slave.”
Then, suddenly, holding my head in her hands, she pressed her lips savagely down on mine.
I tried to twist my head away, but could not.
Then she drew back her head, and, in the darkness I could sense her, and her lips, but an inch from my own.  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 4, page 36)

Speaking as a Free Woman:  

“No, Tarl Cabot of Ko-ro-ba,” she said, “but you well know that I could do nothing that would diminish the worth of your gift to me.  Tarl Cabot, I care for you.”

I realized that she had spoken to me as a free woman, using my name. (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter five, page 53) 

I glanced behind me to see that the girl who carried the market basket had inadvertently fallen in front of the warriors. She was crying angrily at them and waving her broken basket. They pushed her rudely to one side and hurried on. (Nomads of Gor, Chapter twenty-one, page 236) 

Submitting into Slavery:  

“Your name is Aphris of Turia,” he said to her, giving her a name.

“My name is Aphris of Turia,” she said, accepting her name at his hands.

“Submit,” ordered Kamchak.

Trembling Aphris of Turia, kneeling, lowered her head and extended her arms, wrists crossed.  Kamchak quickly and tightly thonged them together. (Nomads of Gor, chapter eleven, page 134)

“Very well,” she said.  And then, angrily, loftily, she walked to the deck before me and then, movement by movement, to my fury, knelt before me, back on her heels, head down, arms extended, wrists crossed, as though for binding.
“You are a fool!”  I told her.
She lifted her head, and smiled. “You may simply leave me here if you wish,” she said.
“It is not in the codes,” I said. (Tarl Cabot speaking of the codes of the Warrior) (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 8, page 97) 

Tarn Saddle, being tied to:  

The belly-up binding position is often used on long rides, or tarn flights, as it is reliably secure and the captive, or slave, is constantly under surveillance, conveniently at hand, completely in view. It is also useful as the captor, or master, may then caress the captive or slave, if only to while away the time. By the time that camp is made a free woman is commonly begging for the brand and collar, and a slave will be beside herself, writhing and gasping, moaning, crying out, begging, with need, pleading that he will be merciful, that he will deign, if only briefly, to attend to the collar of her. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 27, page 1027) 

Tarns, riding of and tarn baskets: 

“Women are seldom permitted to ride on the backs of Tarns,” she said.  “In the carrying  baskets, but not as a warrior rides.” (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter five, page 51)

The baskets in which free women travel have gates, through which they may proceed with suitable modesty, with due elegance. Ellen’s basket was a cargo basket, and a deep one.  (tarn baskets) (Prize of Gor, Chapter 20, page 632)

U – Z

Vanity:  

But, too, many was the time that Ellen had seen men considering even cumbersomely robed, gloved and veiled free women. Doubtless they were considering the hidden slave. To her amusement, Ellen had noted that such free women, sensing themselves within a male’s regard, while pretending to be unaware of the fact, tended to straighten their body, hold their head up, walk well, and such. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 26, page 961) 

Vengeance Buy:  

Indeed, let the woman beware who is the object of a true vengeance buy! A man will pay much to obtain her! And then, sold to him, she is his to do with as he pleases. Let the woman beware, whether slave or free, who has betrayed a Gorean male, lest she come later into his power. Gorean males will pursue such a woman relentlessly, intent on bringing her into their collar. How terrifying to find oneself in chains, owned, stripped, at the feet of one whom one has betrayed! But such cases are rare, and extreme. The usual “vengeance buy” might more appropriately be regarded as little more than a “satisfaction buy. (Prize of Gor, “Chapter 25, page 885) 

Virginity:  

The expression the instructrix had used, if it were to be translated literally into English, was ‘white-silk’. The complementary expression is ‘red-silk’. These are expressions used, incidentally, only of slaves, not of free women. It would be a great insult to refer to a free woman as either “whitesilk” or “red-silk.” That would be terribly vulgar. Duels might be fought about such things. Expressions more suitable to free women, in Gorean, are ‘glana’ and ‘metaglana’, or ‘profalarina’ and ‘falarina’. But even these latter expressions have Gorean connotations, reflecting the views of a natural world. In the first case, the condition of virginity is regarded as one to be superseded; and, in the second case, it is regarded merely as something which comes before something else, something of greater importance, as an antecedent phase or prologue, so to speak. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 14, pages 312-313) 

Vulgarity:  

The Gorean slave girl, unlike free women, particularly those of lower caste, is not permitted to be vulgar. And, indeed, most are not. The virulence of the coffle, as it poured scorn on the shelf girls, was certainly clear, and its expressions vehement and explicit, but it utilized few, if any, expressions which would not have been in common use in the surrounding community. As an analogy one might note that, on Earth, it might be discourteous to refer to a woman as, say, a tart or a hussy, but it would not be regarded as vulgar to do so, whereas certain other expressions, which might come to the mind of a native English speaker, would presumably be regarded as vulgar, even quite vulgar. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 16, page 413) 

Gorean slave girl is not permitted vulgarity. She, though perhaps scarcely clad, or stripped, and kneeling, must be in many ways very “ladylike,” for lack of a better word. This, too, of course, contributes to the contrast between herself and the master, much as did the contrast between “gentleman” and “lady” in the Victorian Era, with its concealed, mysterious, romantic, latent, explosive, subterranean sexuality. Sometimes when low-caste women are enslaved they must be taught to be more ladylike, as their masters will have that of them. Their mouths, for example, may be washed out with soap, literally. That is a symbolic, but surely unpleasant, lesson they are not likely to forget. And it may be repeated as often as the master pleases. Most upper-caste women, whereas they might be smug, haughty or cruel, are not vulgar, regarding vulgar language, allusions, gestures, and such as being incompatible with the dignity of their caste. This is not to deny that an upper-caste woman, say, recently enslaved, or any slave girl, for that matter, may not be commanded upon occasion to use the most vulgar language conceivable, in referring to herself, or in begging for use, and such. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 16, pages 414-415) 

Wagons, travel:

We could see a large, flat wagon, drawn by four huge, beautifully groomed black bosk.
On the wagon, under a fringed, silken canopy, on a curule chair, there sat a woman.
The wagon was flanked by perhaps forty warriors, with spears, twenty to a side. (Captive of Gor, Chapter 7, page 72) 

The Walled Gardens: 

“Are you of Gor or not?  I have never seen my father except on the days of public festivals.  High Caste daughters in Ar are raised in the Walled Gardens, like flowers, until some highborn suitor, preferably a Ubar or Administrator, will pay the bride price set by their fathers.” (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter eight, page 81)

“The women of the Walled Gardens know whatever happens on Gor,” she replied, and I sensed the intrigue, the spying and treachery that must ferment within the gardens.  “I forced my slave girls to lie with soldiers, with merchants and builders, physicians and scribes,” she said, “and I found out a great deal.” (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter eight, page 82)

Theoretically, given the seclusion of the High Caste women of Ar, their gilded confinement in the Walled Gardens, it should be reasonably easy to conceal her identity. (Tarnsman of Gor, Chapter 9, page 86)

“Then I shall show you a love dance,” she said happily, “a dance I learned in the Walled Gardens of Ar.”

“I should like that,” I said, and, as I watched, Talena performed Ar’s strangely beautiful dance of passion. (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter eleven, page 106)

Whipped, in regards to being:  

“You must not forget the whip,” said Mirus.

“Of course not,” said Selius Arconious. “If she is not fully pleasing, she is to be lashed. She is not a free woman. She is only a slave. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 27, pages 1165-1166) 

“Is it true,” he asked, “that Earth women, on Earth, are never whipped?”

“I do not know,” she wept.

“If they are free, of course,” he said, “it would be inappropriate to whip them.”

“Yes, Master,” she cried.

“But doubtless a whipping would do some of them a great deal of good,” said Portus Canio.

(Prize of Gor, Chapter 29, page 1215) 

Worth of:  

The free woman is in theory priceless. Thus she is not comparable with the female slave. As she is priceless, there is a sense in which even thousands of female slaves would not be as valuable as one free woman. On the other hand, reality often embarrasses argument, and it must be admitted that a single female slave, particularly if trained, is often preferred to dozens of free women. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 13, page 293)

At one moment a woman is free and priceless, and then, in another moment, suddenly, she becomes a very practical, tangible commodity, something very real and very factual, something with a specific value, like any other piece of merchandise. In this sense a woman is without specific or actual value until she becomes a slave; it is then that she acquires specific or actual value. To be sure, these considerations are based largely on legal fictions, for, in fact, free women do have tangible values, the higher born being valued better than the lower born, the upper castes over the lower castes, the more intelligent over the less intelligent, the more beautiful over the less beautiful, and so on. To be sure the slave block commonly introduces a radical common denominator. Stripped of all conventional and social dignities and merits, as well as of their clothing, bereft of all artificialities, what is for sale there is, generally, assuming that there is nothing special about the item, that it is not the daughter of a Ubar, or the daughter of one’s worst enemy, or such, is the intelligence, sensitivity, beauty and personness of the item herself. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 13, pages 293-294)

Too, for the first time I have an actual value. Free women may be priceless, but, thus, they are worth

nothing. As what I am I now have a value and it will be determined by my beauty, which I have reason to believe is considerable, the desire of men, and the conditions of the market. On this world wars have been fought for slaves. We have value. (Prize of Gor, Chapter 19, pages 620-621) 

Yielding as a Free Woman:

And in the moments before she yielded, when I sensed her readiness, to her faint protest, then joy, I removed from her throat the slave collar that her yielding, our game ended, would be that of the free woman, glorious in the eager and willing, the joyous, bestowal of herself.  (Raiders of Gor, Chapter 16, page 246)


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